the linocut

Some of my work is done using a style referred to as a linocut.  What is a linocut?

Linocut is a printmaking technique, a variant of woodcut in which a sheet of linoleum (sometimes mounted on a wooden block) is used for the relief surface. A design is cut into the linoleum surface with a sharp knife, V-shaped chisel or gouge, with the raised (uncarved) areas representing a reversal (mirror image) of the parts to show printed. The linoleum sheet is inked with a roller (called a brayer), and then impressed onto paper or fabric. The actual printing can be done by hand or with a press.

Although linoleum as a floor covering dates to the 1860, the linocut printing technique was used first by the artists of Die Brücke in Germany between 1905-13 where it had been similarly used for wallpaper printing. They initially described their prints as woodcuts however, which sounded more respectable.

As the material being carved has no particular direction to its grain and does not tend to split, it is easier to obtain certain artistic effects with Lino than with most woods, although the resultant prints can lack the often angular grainy character of woodcuts and engravings. Lino is much easier to cut than wood; especially when heated, but the pressure of the printing process degrades the plate faster and it is difficult to create larger works due to the material’s fragility.

Linocuts can also be achieved by the careful application of Sodium hydroxide in a paste to parts of the surface of the Lino. This creates a surface similar to a soft ground etching and these Caustic-Lino plates can be printed in either a relief, intaglio or a viscosity printing manner.

Colour linocuts can be made by using a different block for each colour as in a woodcut, but, as Pablo Picasso demonstrated quite effectively, such prints can also be achieved using a single piece of linoleum in what is called the ‘reductive’ print method. Essentially, after each successive colour is imprinted onto the paper, the artist then cleans the lino plate and cuts away what will not be imprinted for the subsequently applied color.

I have used this method on a couple of sketch card sets, I may be one of the only artists employing this method for traditional sketch cards.

Here is an example of the process used for the current Captain America: The First Avenger set released by Upper Deck.  On these, it was a combination of linocut, stencil, and some traditional art.

Product details:

The First Avenger takes to the screen and is captured in Upper Deck’s Captain America Movie Trading Card set featuring highly collectible cards showcasing many of the memorable moments from the movie. Autographs from the cast, movie memorabilia, and some of the recognizable manufactured patches seen in the film provide a great chase for collectors to try and get a piece of the movie and its stars!

Get 2 of the following per box!
* Sketch Cards
* Movie Memorabilia Cards
* Autograph Cards
* Insignia Patch Cards

Collect actor autographs and pieces of memorabilia that came directly from costumes shown in the movie!

Chase one of a kind artist sketch cards from some of the greatest comic artists in the industry – at least 10 per case!

Get manufactured insignia patch cards featuring some of the famous uniform logos and patches prevalent in the movie!

Cast includes top actors like:
* Chris Evans (Captain America & Steve Rogers)
* Tommy Lee Jones (General Chester Phillips)
* Hugo Weaving (The Red Skull)
* Samuel L. Jackson (Nick Fury)
* Hayley Atwell (Peggy Carter)
* And more!

PRODUCT BREAKDOWN:

Captain America Memorabilia and Autograph Cards!
* Memorabilia Cards – inserted 1:12
* Manufactured Insignia Patch Cards – inserted 1:16
* Autograph Cards – inserted 1:288

Unique Marvel Sketch Cards!
* Artist Sketch Cards – inserted 1:48

Subset Cards!
* 9 Talent of Captain America Cards
* 1 Captain America Movie Poster Card
* 13 Weapons of Choice Cards
* 12 Captain America Comic Classic Covers Cards

Regular Cards
* 90 Regular Cards

24 packs per box, 7 cards per pack

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